Free tranny sex pics lactating. Shemale lactating and masturbating.



Free tranny sex pics lactating

Free tranny sex pics lactating

Key terms and concepts Gender vs. Sex Our reproductive organs and sexual anatomy define our physical sex — male, female, or intersex. The term for such people is cisgender. Transgender, transsexual, and genderfluid people have a gender identity or gender expression that does not match what their particular society expects of them according to their anatomy. Others do not want or are unable to obtain such interventions, but may express their gender in other ways such as choices of clothing or makeup.

Their sexual orientation refers to what kind of person they are sexually attracted to. A person can be trans and gay, or trans and straight, or trans and bisexual, etc. Some masculine-identified trans people use this term to describe the act of feeding their baby from their chest, regardless of whether they have had chest surgery.

Note that others prefer to say breastfeeding or nursing. The choice is individual, and health care providers should ask clients what they prefer. The assumption that there are two genders, male and female. Many trans people understand gender as a spectrum. Transgender people may or may not wish to modify their bodies to varying degrees by taking hormones or having surgery. Transsexual people usually wish to modify their bodies in order to alleviate this incongruence.

This older term is narrower in its definition than the newer umbrella term, transgender see above , but is still preferred by some trans individuals. If you are unsure of which pronouns a particular individual may use, simply ask in a respectful manner. If you make a mistake, apologize promptly and move on. The following terms are derogatory. Biological sex is not purely binary, as various international sports organizations have been finding out when they pursue sex testing of athletes.

Information for trans women and their helpers Trans women are individuals who were designated as male at birth based on their anatomy but identify on the feminine side of the gender spectrum.

Hormone replacement therapy Trans women commonly take anti-androgen medication if they have not had orchiectomy bilateral testicle removal. Following orchiectomy, anti-androgen therapy may be ceased and estrogen dosage decreased. Some physicians prescribe estrogen but not progestin for trans women under the assumption that adding progestin does not increase breast size over estrogen alone. However, progesterone plays an important role in lobuloalveolar development.

For this reason, a trans woman may wish to take progestin in addition to estrogen if she intends to breastfeed in the future. Inducing Lactation Trans women may induce lactation by following the Newman-Goldfarb protocol. A physician may prescribe the appropriate medications. Birth control pills should be started about six months before the baby is expected or as soon as possible.

Domperidone is also suggested in the protocol. The domperidone is normally continued for the duration of the lactation period. A trans woman should discuss with a physician, such as a reproductive endocrinologist, what kind of hormone treatment is best to take during lactation.

Unfortunately, there has been little to no research done in this area. One trans woman reported that she successfully took a decreased dose of her usual estrogen while lactating. Medications, such as anti-androgens or estrogens, should be carefully considered for safety during lactation on an individual basis, like with any medication or supplement.

Finding health care professionals To date, there has been much more extensive media coverage and interest from health care providers and researchers regarding the needs of trans men around lactation than for trans women. Trans women also typically face higher levels of discrimination and violence in society in general.

Anecdotally speaking, I have received several reports of trans women unable to find local breastfeeding counselors or lactation consultants willing to assist them. Consultations online or by phone may be necessary for this reason.

Breastfeeding goals Some trans women have induced lactation with impressive results, providing nearly a full supply to their babies. The amount of milk that is produced will depend somewhat on how many years the woman used hormones prior to inducing lactation, and how fully her glandular tissue developed during that time.

As is the case with chestfeeding trans men, the amount of milk that is produced is not the only consideration since the nursing relationship may be equally or even more important to the nursing couple.

An at-breast supplementer may be used to support a nursing relationship. Group meetings Health care providers and breastfeeding counselors should encourage trans breastfeeding parents to attend group meetings.

Those leading meetings should ensure that a safe and positive environment is provided. Trans parents may already feel isolated, especially if they do not know other LGBT families. Group meetings can be tremendously beneficial. Information for transmasculine individuals and their helpers Transmasculine individuals are people who were designated as female at birth according to their anatomy but identify on the masculine side of the gender spectrum.

Remember that if you are unsure, it is best to ask about which names and pronouns an individual uses. Health care providers and volunteers should update language on web sites, intake forms and information sheets to be inclusive of trans men and genderfluid individuals.

Growth or re-growth after top surgery of chest tissue during pregnancy may bring up extreme feelings of gender dysphoria in some individuals, possibly causing anxiety or even depression. Chestfeeding can do the same. For this reason, deciding to chestfeed is a very personal choice. Feelings of gender dysphoria may be triggered or exacerbated when a trans individual is misgendered by others, including health care providers and lactation helpers.

Testosterone Use Many, but not all, trans men choose to take testosterone. Testosterone normally causes the cessation of menstruation and ovulation, and brings about male secondary sex characteristics. When a trans man stops taking testosterone, his cycles are likely to return after several weeks or months, depending on how long he took the medication and his own physical particularities. Throughout the medical literature, it has been assumed that testosterone use permanently affects secondary sex characteristics.

Some trans men may retain their facial hair and deeper voice when they stop taking testosterone, but others may not. Although rare, some trans men have been known to become pregnant accidentally while taking testosterone. Testosterone is highly toxic to the fetus and should never be used during pregnancy. However, because the body metabolizes and clears testosterone rapidly, it is considered safe to conceive within a few months of discontinuing most forms of testosterone therapy.

In our research article , my study group reported the first documented instance of a trans individual taking testosterone during the lactation period. The participant reported that the blood tests showed no evidence of testosterone exposure in the child. The participant did not feel that his milk supply was adversely affected by taking testosterone. This is different from a mastectomy a cancer treatment , or a breast reduction, which is performed to make a smaller but still female chest. The goal of top surgery is to create a male-appearing chest.

Complete removal of the mammary tissue would result in a sunken chest shape. The preferred surgical technique for top surgery is variable, depending on factors such as volume of tissue and skin elasticity of the client. However, some surgeons performing the double incision surgery use a pedicle technique to keep the nipple attached to a thin stalk of tissue throughout the procedure. Trans men who are planning top surgery after weaning should note that many surgeons require clients to wait six months after the end of lactation before having chest or breast surgery.

Binding A trans man who has not had top surgery may choose to bind his chest in order to flatten it, thereby managing his gender dysphoria. Many years of binding may adversely affect the glandular tissue. Binding during the immediate postpartum period will increase the risk of blocked ducts and mastitis and may damage the milk supply. However, some individuals have had success with occasional, careful binding once the milk supply is well established and regulated.

Anyone who practices binding during the lactation period should be advised of the risks of doing so, and should monitor the health of their chest closely. Chestfeeding Goals Some trans men who give birth do not want to chestfeed at all, in some cases for reasons to do with mental health and gender dysphoria.

Others do, and sometimes opt to postpone desired top surgery so that they will be able to produce a full milk supply. If an individual is not comfortable being touched, find other ways to help, such as demonstrating on yourself. Watch for signs of postpartum depression. Trans individuals may be at risk due to experiences of gender dysphoria in addition to the usual challenges of giving birth and caring for a newborn. Photo used with permission. When assisting those who wish to chestfeed after a previous top surgery, it is essential to remember that nursing a baby is not only about the milk.

An individual who has had surgery may produce a surprising amount of milk, or only drops, or nothing at all. Any amount of milk is valuable. By using an at-chest at-breast supplementer, the parent and baby can gain the benefit of bonding through a nursing relationship even in the absence of milk production. In addition, the action of nursing helps promote the normal development of the jaws and teeth in the infant.

Latching may be challenging for a parent who has had previous top surgery due to a relative lack of pliable tissue and skin. When providing assistance, be creative and expect to try many different grasps from varying angles in order to find what works.

A reclining position may unfortunately cause the chest tissue to become even more taut and difficult to latch to. In this case, football hold or cross cradle may be easier. A nipple shield might also be considered although it may be impractical to juggle both a nipple shield and a supplementer. Supporting the Decision NOT to Nurse Lactation helpers can support an individual who has chosen not to chestfeed by sharing how to quickly and safely reduce the milk supply after the birth.

Explain the supply and demand system that governs lactation. Encourage the client to remove only as much milk as necessary to feel relatively comfortable, since removing more milk will cause the body to increase production. Cold compresses and cold cabbage leaves may help reduce pain and swelling. The parent should not bind at this time due to the increased risk of pain, blocked ducts, and mastitis.

Several herbs such as sage, peppermint, and parsley are said to decrease milk supply. Trans men who have had top surgery, regardless of surgical technique, should not assume that their body will not make milk following birth. If they plan not to chestfeed, they and their health care providers should watch for signs of engorgement and mastitis.

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Why Do Men Have Nipples..... Transsexual Lactation



Free tranny sex pics lactating

Key terms and concepts Gender vs. Sex Our reproductive organs and sexual anatomy define our physical sex — male, female, or intersex. The term for such people is cisgender. Transgender, transsexual, and genderfluid people have a gender identity or gender expression that does not match what their particular society expects of them according to their anatomy. Others do not want or are unable to obtain such interventions, but may express their gender in other ways such as choices of clothing or makeup.

Their sexual orientation refers to what kind of person they are sexually attracted to. A person can be trans and gay, or trans and straight, or trans and bisexual, etc. Some masculine-identified trans people use this term to describe the act of feeding their baby from their chest, regardless of whether they have had chest surgery.

Note that others prefer to say breastfeeding or nursing. The choice is individual, and health care providers should ask clients what they prefer. The assumption that there are two genders, male and female.

Many trans people understand gender as a spectrum. Transgender people may or may not wish to modify their bodies to varying degrees by taking hormones or having surgery. Transsexual people usually wish to modify their bodies in order to alleviate this incongruence. This older term is narrower in its definition than the newer umbrella term, transgender see above , but is still preferred by some trans individuals.

If you are unsure of which pronouns a particular individual may use, simply ask in a respectful manner. If you make a mistake, apologize promptly and move on. The following terms are derogatory. Biological sex is not purely binary, as various international sports organizations have been finding out when they pursue sex testing of athletes. Information for trans women and their helpers Trans women are individuals who were designated as male at birth based on their anatomy but identify on the feminine side of the gender spectrum.

Hormone replacement therapy Trans women commonly take anti-androgen medication if they have not had orchiectomy bilateral testicle removal. Following orchiectomy, anti-androgen therapy may be ceased and estrogen dosage decreased. Some physicians prescribe estrogen but not progestin for trans women under the assumption that adding progestin does not increase breast size over estrogen alone.

However, progesterone plays an important role in lobuloalveolar development. For this reason, a trans woman may wish to take progestin in addition to estrogen if she intends to breastfeed in the future. Inducing Lactation Trans women may induce lactation by following the Newman-Goldfarb protocol.

A physician may prescribe the appropriate medications. Birth control pills should be started about six months before the baby is expected or as soon as possible. Domperidone is also suggested in the protocol. The domperidone is normally continued for the duration of the lactation period. A trans woman should discuss with a physician, such as a reproductive endocrinologist, what kind of hormone treatment is best to take during lactation. Unfortunately, there has been little to no research done in this area.

One trans woman reported that she successfully took a decreased dose of her usual estrogen while lactating. Medications, such as anti-androgens or estrogens, should be carefully considered for safety during lactation on an individual basis, like with any medication or supplement. Finding health care professionals To date, there has been much more extensive media coverage and interest from health care providers and researchers regarding the needs of trans men around lactation than for trans women.

Trans women also typically face higher levels of discrimination and violence in society in general. Anecdotally speaking, I have received several reports of trans women unable to find local breastfeeding counselors or lactation consultants willing to assist them.

Consultations online or by phone may be necessary for this reason. Breastfeeding goals Some trans women have induced lactation with impressive results, providing nearly a full supply to their babies.

The amount of milk that is produced will depend somewhat on how many years the woman used hormones prior to inducing lactation, and how fully her glandular tissue developed during that time. As is the case with chestfeeding trans men, the amount of milk that is produced is not the only consideration since the nursing relationship may be equally or even more important to the nursing couple.

An at-breast supplementer may be used to support a nursing relationship. Group meetings Health care providers and breastfeeding counselors should encourage trans breastfeeding parents to attend group meetings. Those leading meetings should ensure that a safe and positive environment is provided. Trans parents may already feel isolated, especially if they do not know other LGBT families.

Group meetings can be tremendously beneficial. Information for transmasculine individuals and their helpers Transmasculine individuals are people who were designated as female at birth according to their anatomy but identify on the masculine side of the gender spectrum.

Remember that if you are unsure, it is best to ask about which names and pronouns an individual uses. Health care providers and volunteers should update language on web sites, intake forms and information sheets to be inclusive of trans men and genderfluid individuals. Growth or re-growth after top surgery of chest tissue during pregnancy may bring up extreme feelings of gender dysphoria in some individuals, possibly causing anxiety or even depression.

Chestfeeding can do the same. For this reason, deciding to chestfeed is a very personal choice. Feelings of gender dysphoria may be triggered or exacerbated when a trans individual is misgendered by others, including health care providers and lactation helpers.

Testosterone Use Many, but not all, trans men choose to take testosterone. Testosterone normally causes the cessation of menstruation and ovulation, and brings about male secondary sex characteristics. When a trans man stops taking testosterone, his cycles are likely to return after several weeks or months, depending on how long he took the medication and his own physical particularities.

Throughout the medical literature, it has been assumed that testosterone use permanently affects secondary sex characteristics. Some trans men may retain their facial hair and deeper voice when they stop taking testosterone, but others may not. Although rare, some trans men have been known to become pregnant accidentally while taking testosterone. Testosterone is highly toxic to the fetus and should never be used during pregnancy. However, because the body metabolizes and clears testosterone rapidly, it is considered safe to conceive within a few months of discontinuing most forms of testosterone therapy.

In our research article , my study group reported the first documented instance of a trans individual taking testosterone during the lactation period.

The participant reported that the blood tests showed no evidence of testosterone exposure in the child. The participant did not feel that his milk supply was adversely affected by taking testosterone. This is different from a mastectomy a cancer treatment , or a breast reduction, which is performed to make a smaller but still female chest. The goal of top surgery is to create a male-appearing chest.

Complete removal of the mammary tissue would result in a sunken chest shape. The preferred surgical technique for top surgery is variable, depending on factors such as volume of tissue and skin elasticity of the client. However, some surgeons performing the double incision surgery use a pedicle technique to keep the nipple attached to a thin stalk of tissue throughout the procedure. Trans men who are planning top surgery after weaning should note that many surgeons require clients to wait six months after the end of lactation before having chest or breast surgery.

Binding A trans man who has not had top surgery may choose to bind his chest in order to flatten it, thereby managing his gender dysphoria. Many years of binding may adversely affect the glandular tissue. Binding during the immediate postpartum period will increase the risk of blocked ducts and mastitis and may damage the milk supply.

However, some individuals have had success with occasional, careful binding once the milk supply is well established and regulated.

Anyone who practices binding during the lactation period should be advised of the risks of doing so, and should monitor the health of their chest closely. Chestfeeding Goals Some trans men who give birth do not want to chestfeed at all, in some cases for reasons to do with mental health and gender dysphoria. Others do, and sometimes opt to postpone desired top surgery so that they will be able to produce a full milk supply. If an individual is not comfortable being touched, find other ways to help, such as demonstrating on yourself.

Watch for signs of postpartum depression. Trans individuals may be at risk due to experiences of gender dysphoria in addition to the usual challenges of giving birth and caring for a newborn. Photo used with permission. When assisting those who wish to chestfeed after a previous top surgery, it is essential to remember that nursing a baby is not only about the milk.

An individual who has had surgery may produce a surprising amount of milk, or only drops, or nothing at all. Any amount of milk is valuable. By using an at-chest at-breast supplementer, the parent and baby can gain the benefit of bonding through a nursing relationship even in the absence of milk production. In addition, the action of nursing helps promote the normal development of the jaws and teeth in the infant.

Latching may be challenging for a parent who has had previous top surgery due to a relative lack of pliable tissue and skin. When providing assistance, be creative and expect to try many different grasps from varying angles in order to find what works.

A reclining position may unfortunately cause the chest tissue to become even more taut and difficult to latch to. In this case, football hold or cross cradle may be easier. A nipple shield might also be considered although it may be impractical to juggle both a nipple shield and a supplementer. Supporting the Decision NOT to Nurse Lactation helpers can support an individual who has chosen not to chestfeed by sharing how to quickly and safely reduce the milk supply after the birth.

Explain the supply and demand system that governs lactation. Encourage the client to remove only as much milk as necessary to feel relatively comfortable, since removing more milk will cause the body to increase production. Cold compresses and cold cabbage leaves may help reduce pain and swelling. The parent should not bind at this time due to the increased risk of pain, blocked ducts, and mastitis. Several herbs such as sage, peppermint, and parsley are said to decrease milk supply. Trans men who have had top surgery, regardless of surgical technique, should not assume that their body will not make milk following birth.

If they plan not to chestfeed, they and their health care providers should watch for signs of engorgement and mastitis.

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3 Comments

  1. Explain the supply and demand system that governs lactation. The participant reported that the blood tests showed no evidence of testosterone exposure in the child. This is different from a mastectomy a cancer treatment , or a breast reduction, which is performed to make a smaller but still female chest.

  2. Encourage the client to remove only as much milk as necessary to feel relatively comfortable, since removing more milk will cause the body to increase production. Their sexual orientation refers to what kind of person they are sexually attracted to. A reclining position may unfortunately cause the chest tissue to become even more taut and difficult to latch to.

  3. Inducing Lactation Trans women may induce lactation by following the Newman-Goldfarb protocol.

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