Having sex during a lightening storm. Why is sex so much better during a thunder storm?.



Having sex during a lightening storm

Having sex during a lightening storm

Email That stunning flash and loud bang. Temperatures hotter than the surface of the sun. For thousands of years, lightning has sparked our imagination. The ancient Greeks dreamed of lightning bolts hurled by the mighty Zeus.

Lightning gave life to Dr. As the modern day saying goes, "lightning never strikes twice. It does," said Paul Williams. He was camping with his Boy Scout troop when a thunderstorm blew through their campsite. He was in a tent with another camper when, "before we knew it we were kind of thrown onto the ground. You couldn't stand up. It just kind of collapsed your legs. He'd been sailing on the Potomac and had docked in calm weather at a friend's house. We were on the porch. And we saw the boat starting to rock.

So we knew we had to come down and tie it down," Williams said. And it was literally the first bolt that came out of the sky happened to land right between us. He blacked out and fell on his back. So everything was completely silent. And I didn't have any feeling in my body. I didn't know what to think. I really didn't know if I was alive or dead. He continues to suffer problems with his short-term memory. He still keeps the tattered swimming trunks he was wearing when he was struck.

He said they are "literally in shreds … as though a bear claw had taken its swipe right across the front. That's because taller objects provide the shortest path from the cloud to the ground. So lightning does strike the same place twice.

In fact, the Empire State Building is struck by lightning an average of 23 times a year. And there's more bad news for men like Williams: Lightning strikes men four times more often than women. This isn't because men actually attract the lightning, but rather because men tend to spend more time outdoors than women do.

Fact and Fiction Nationwide, lightning kills about people every year, but it kills more people in Florida than any other state because of the state's frequent thunderstorms. That makes it the perfect place for scientists like Martin Uman to study lightning. There's not a myth about lightning that Uman hasn't heard, especially when it comes to protecting yourself. Should you stand on one foot? Should you lie flat on the ground? Should you run for the nearest tree? Find Appropriate Shelter According to Uman, your priority in a lightning storm should be to find shelter, preferably a structure with electrical wiring or, even better, a lightning rod.

The lightning bolt will be drawn to the rod or the metal wiring, and will then be conducted through the wiring into the ground, leaving the person inside the structure unscathed.

You're Safe in Your Home So are you safest inside your home? Back in the days of candles and gaslights, that wasn't true because most houses were made of wood.

Lightning is drawn to the nearest metal object, so it would often strike people sleeping in their metal-framed beds. Rest assured, this is no longer the case. The lightning gets to the wiring before it gets to where you are, and the powerful current is carried into the ground, he said.

Don't Hold a Corded Electronic Device Lots of people still wonder, however, whether lightning will be more likely to hurt them if they're on the telephone, listening to the radio or watching television during a storm.

If lightning strikes, the current could carry through those appliances, he said. Find a Metal Car and Get Inside For the most part, buildings are the safest place to be, but what if you can't make your way indoors? According to Uman, you should try to find a metal car and get inside. Inside the car, you're surrounded by a closed metal circuit.

Should lightning strike the car, most of the current will travel through the metal frame of the car, leaving you safe inside. Avoid Open Spaces But what if you're caught in a thunderstorm in the middle of a field, and a building or a car is just too far away?

Does it help to squat on one leg? If lightning strikes nearby and you have two feet on the ground, spread apart, rather than held firmly together, "then the lightning is liable to go up one leg and down the other. Neither stance will help if the lightning strikes you directly. Avoid Tall Trees And if you run into a forest? Surprisingly, you may be safe. That's if all of the trees are the same size. It's just as likely that lightning will hit one tree as another, so your odds of avoiding a strike are pretty good.

But if you're under an isolated tree, or if one tree is taller than the others, all bets are off. Remember, if you're caught in a storm, the safest place to be is inside a building, but be sure to avoid using any plumbing or plugged-in appliances.

If you can't get inside, get in a car. But the safest thing is not to get caught out in the storm in the first place. Take it from the guy who's been zapped. I make no apologies for it.

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Things To Do During A Storm



Having sex during a lightening storm

Email That stunning flash and loud bang. Temperatures hotter than the surface of the sun. For thousands of years, lightning has sparked our imagination. The ancient Greeks dreamed of lightning bolts hurled by the mighty Zeus. Lightning gave life to Dr.

As the modern day saying goes, "lightning never strikes twice. It does," said Paul Williams. He was camping with his Boy Scout troop when a thunderstorm blew through their campsite. He was in a tent with another camper when, "before we knew it we were kind of thrown onto the ground. You couldn't stand up. It just kind of collapsed your legs. He'd been sailing on the Potomac and had docked in calm weather at a friend's house. We were on the porch. And we saw the boat starting to rock.

So we knew we had to come down and tie it down," Williams said. And it was literally the first bolt that came out of the sky happened to land right between us. He blacked out and fell on his back. So everything was completely silent. And I didn't have any feeling in my body. I didn't know what to think. I really didn't know if I was alive or dead. He continues to suffer problems with his short-term memory. He still keeps the tattered swimming trunks he was wearing when he was struck.

He said they are "literally in shreds … as though a bear claw had taken its swipe right across the front. That's because taller objects provide the shortest path from the cloud to the ground. So lightning does strike the same place twice. In fact, the Empire State Building is struck by lightning an average of 23 times a year. And there's more bad news for men like Williams: Lightning strikes men four times more often than women.

This isn't because men actually attract the lightning, but rather because men tend to spend more time outdoors than women do. Fact and Fiction Nationwide, lightning kills about people every year, but it kills more people in Florida than any other state because of the state's frequent thunderstorms. That makes it the perfect place for scientists like Martin Uman to study lightning.

There's not a myth about lightning that Uman hasn't heard, especially when it comes to protecting yourself. Should you stand on one foot? Should you lie flat on the ground? Should you run for the nearest tree? Find Appropriate Shelter According to Uman, your priority in a lightning storm should be to find shelter, preferably a structure with electrical wiring or, even better, a lightning rod.

The lightning bolt will be drawn to the rod or the metal wiring, and will then be conducted through the wiring into the ground, leaving the person inside the structure unscathed. You're Safe in Your Home So are you safest inside your home?

Back in the days of candles and gaslights, that wasn't true because most houses were made of wood. Lightning is drawn to the nearest metal object, so it would often strike people sleeping in their metal-framed beds. Rest assured, this is no longer the case. The lightning gets to the wiring before it gets to where you are, and the powerful current is carried into the ground, he said. Don't Hold a Corded Electronic Device Lots of people still wonder, however, whether lightning will be more likely to hurt them if they're on the telephone, listening to the radio or watching television during a storm.

If lightning strikes, the current could carry through those appliances, he said. Find a Metal Car and Get Inside For the most part, buildings are the safest place to be, but what if you can't make your way indoors?

According to Uman, you should try to find a metal car and get inside. Inside the car, you're surrounded by a closed metal circuit. Should lightning strike the car, most of the current will travel through the metal frame of the car, leaving you safe inside. Avoid Open Spaces But what if you're caught in a thunderstorm in the middle of a field, and a building or a car is just too far away?

Does it help to squat on one leg? If lightning strikes nearby and you have two feet on the ground, spread apart, rather than held firmly together, "then the lightning is liable to go up one leg and down the other. Neither stance will help if the lightning strikes you directly. Avoid Tall Trees And if you run into a forest?

Surprisingly, you may be safe. That's if all of the trees are the same size. It's just as likely that lightning will hit one tree as another, so your odds of avoiding a strike are pretty good. But if you're under an isolated tree, or if one tree is taller than the others, all bets are off. Remember, if you're caught in a storm, the safest place to be is inside a building, but be sure to avoid using any plumbing or plugged-in appliances.

If you can't get inside, get in a car. But the safest thing is not to get caught out in the storm in the first place. Take it from the guy who's been zapped.

I make no apologies for it.

Having sex during a lightening storm

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5 Comments

  1. Back in the days of candles and gaslights, that wasn't true because most houses were made of wood. It does," said Paul Williams. And there's more bad news for men like Williams:

  2. Inside the car, you're surrounded by a closed metal circuit. It just kind of collapsed your legs. I make no apologies for it.

  3. He was in a tent with another camper when, "before we knew it we were kind of thrown onto the ground.

  4. There's not a myth about lightning that Uman hasn't heard, especially when it comes to protecting yourself. He blacked out and fell on his back.

  5. We were on the porch. Email That stunning flash and loud bang. The lightning gets to the wiring before it gets to where you are, and the powerful current is carried into the ground, he said.

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