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A few answered to let her know whether or not they were of Hispanic descent and if they wanted to participate in forming a bar association, but the majority did not respond. She obtained the by-laws of the National and the District of Columbia Hispanic Bar associations and proceeded to form the corporation.

Afterwards, she personally called those lawyers she knew were Hispanic and invited them to her law office in Montgomery County. Although she gave credit for the work accomplished to the Association, in those early days the budding non-profit enterprise was pretty much a one-woman-act.

In the beginning, it was basically Mayda, her associate Robert Lorenzo, and her secretary. We worked with the first few presidents helping to guide the association and giving the help needed, if requested. For some years we also had a Christmas party in my office and invited all the judges from the county as well as other Hispanic leaders.

It was fun and we were growing. Neil Fagan remembers that Mayda and Marielsa Bernard MHBA president, — one of the Latino attorneys who had been part of that first group and who would become the second Latina judge in the state — testified in Annapolis about the need for Spanish and other language interpreters, and for training and certification of their qualifications.

The Montgomery County pro bono events saw or more people each. This was, according to Judge Bernard, probably because they were held following the Spanish language Mass. We also had tables set up for various areas of the law, such as criminal, traffic, family relations, as well as immigration.

I ensured that the agency or community organization representatives were all bilingual and that no one would be charged for information, and we had a protocol which did not allow attorneys to actively solicit clients as a result of their participation in the pro bono legal fair.

It was my goal, as it has always been, to be inclusive of other minorities. So, in this case, I invited the Korean leaders and community to join our Association. We had Spanish-speaking as well as Korean-speaking interpreters, and signs in both languages. The heart of the event were the Mock trials we held in the areas of domestic violence, criminal law and traffic law. We had refreshments and cupcakes and balloons. This Circuit Court House event with the Korean Bar was truly a success because we had the cooperation of individuals like Judges Weinstein, Harrington, and other judges who presided over the mock trials, and the Prosecutors who took part in the criminal and traffic mock trials.

They were all marvelous and their contributions were of great benefit for the Hispanic and Korean communities. In addition to taking on legal issues affecting the Hispanic community and educating Latinos on their legal rights and responsibilities, in keeping with its mission, the MHBA advocated for the appointment of highly qualified Hispanics to the bench in the State of Maryland.

The original home for the Centro de la Comunidad was then located far away from Eastern Avenue. Our Bar sponsored a community fair at the Centro. I was honored to chair this effort. The City agreed to provide transportation on that Saturday afternoon to the families that congregated at the EBLO location on the East side of the City.

We had at least members of the community present — judges, health officials, housing representatives and members of our Bar. I presided over a mock domestic violence trial with a volunteer interpreter and we had members of the House of Ruth present.

The bill proposed by the MHBA gave the victims of these crimes an avenue for compensation. MICA allowed the victimized immigrants and their families to recover up to three times the amount they were illegally charged by the consultants. Ultimately, the MHBA and the local Hispanic community agreed with Councilmember Jim Kraft that the bill should not move forward, thus bringing the issue to a conclusion. Pro bono attorneys provided more than combined consultations at these fairs.

As a MNAP member, the Association co-signed a letter addressed to then President-Elect Obama requesting that his administration make immigration reform a priority.

Also appearing before that legislative body, on behalf of the MHBA as Immigration Committee Community Liaison, Chiriboga-Roby testified in support of SB41 to allow the opportunity for students who are Maryland residents to pay affordable in-state college tuition, regardless of immigration status. In addition, she later testified and entered into the record her opposition to SB because it would limit eligibility for Senatorial and Delegate scholarship programs to citizens and lawful permanent residents, and thus arbitrarily exclude immigrants who are in lawful immigration status or who have permission from the Department of Homeland Security to live and work in the United States.

The purpose of the receptions was to introduce law students from the two local law schools to each other, to the Association and to judges. They were successful and I hope that we can sponsor them again. Bettina also advocated for the appointment of Hispanics in a majority of Governor-appointed judicial commissions in the state.

With this growth, the Association has benefited by renewed energy, ideas, and enthusiasm. One recent development has been an effort to partner with other minority bar associations across the state in various ways. To that end, the MHBA has co-sponsored several legal networking events.

By continuing to serve our membership with important networking opportunities, the MHBA stays relevant to its membership as the Hispanic legal population in Maryland grows.

This historical retrospective speaks of just a few of the many projects that the MHBA has been involved in and implemented as a bar organization. With the steadfast commitment and participation of its membership, The Maryland Hispanic Bar Association will continue to fulfill its mission and purpose — to remain ever vigilant regarding the legal rights of minorities, to advocate for the nomination of qualified Latino attorneys to the bench, and to advance the profession through service to the community.

Compiled by Sylvia Ontaneda-Bernales, Esq.

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Spanish speaking mature sex videos

A few answered to let her know whether or not they were of Hispanic descent and if they wanted to participate in forming a bar association, but the majority did not respond. She obtained the by-laws of the National and the District of Columbia Hispanic Bar associations and proceeded to form the corporation.

Afterwards, she personally called those lawyers she knew were Hispanic and invited them to her law office in Montgomery County.

Although she gave credit for the work accomplished to the Association, in those early days the budding non-profit enterprise was pretty much a one-woman-act. In the beginning, it was basically Mayda, her associate Robert Lorenzo, and her secretary. We worked with the first few presidents helping to guide the association and giving the help needed, if requested. For some years we also had a Christmas party in my office and invited all the judges from the county as well as other Hispanic leaders.

It was fun and we were growing. Neil Fagan remembers that Mayda and Marielsa Bernard MHBA president, — one of the Latino attorneys who had been part of that first group and who would become the second Latina judge in the state — testified in Annapolis about the need for Spanish and other language interpreters, and for training and certification of their qualifications.

The Montgomery County pro bono events saw or more people each. This was, according to Judge Bernard, probably because they were held following the Spanish language Mass.

We also had tables set up for various areas of the law, such as criminal, traffic, family relations, as well as immigration. I ensured that the agency or community organization representatives were all bilingual and that no one would be charged for information, and we had a protocol which did not allow attorneys to actively solicit clients as a result of their participation in the pro bono legal fair.

It was my goal, as it has always been, to be inclusive of other minorities. So, in this case, I invited the Korean leaders and community to join our Association. We had Spanish-speaking as well as Korean-speaking interpreters, and signs in both languages. The heart of the event were the Mock trials we held in the areas of domestic violence, criminal law and traffic law. We had refreshments and cupcakes and balloons. This Circuit Court House event with the Korean Bar was truly a success because we had the cooperation of individuals like Judges Weinstein, Harrington, and other judges who presided over the mock trials, and the Prosecutors who took part in the criminal and traffic mock trials.

They were all marvelous and their contributions were of great benefit for the Hispanic and Korean communities. In addition to taking on legal issues affecting the Hispanic community and educating Latinos on their legal rights and responsibilities, in keeping with its mission, the MHBA advocated for the appointment of highly qualified Hispanics to the bench in the State of Maryland.

The original home for the Centro de la Comunidad was then located far away from Eastern Avenue. Our Bar sponsored a community fair at the Centro. I was honored to chair this effort. The City agreed to provide transportation on that Saturday afternoon to the families that congregated at the EBLO location on the East side of the City. We had at least members of the community present — judges, health officials, housing representatives and members of our Bar. I presided over a mock domestic violence trial with a volunteer interpreter and we had members of the House of Ruth present.

The bill proposed by the MHBA gave the victims of these crimes an avenue for compensation. MICA allowed the victimized immigrants and their families to recover up to three times the amount they were illegally charged by the consultants.

Ultimately, the MHBA and the local Hispanic community agreed with Councilmember Jim Kraft that the bill should not move forward, thus bringing the issue to a conclusion. Pro bono attorneys provided more than combined consultations at these fairs. As a MNAP member, the Association co-signed a letter addressed to then President-Elect Obama requesting that his administration make immigration reform a priority.

Also appearing before that legislative body, on behalf of the MHBA as Immigration Committee Community Liaison, Chiriboga-Roby testified in support of SB41 to allow the opportunity for students who are Maryland residents to pay affordable in-state college tuition, regardless of immigration status. In addition, she later testified and entered into the record her opposition to SB because it would limit eligibility for Senatorial and Delegate scholarship programs to citizens and lawful permanent residents, and thus arbitrarily exclude immigrants who are in lawful immigration status or who have permission from the Department of Homeland Security to live and work in the United States.

The purpose of the receptions was to introduce law students from the two local law schools to each other, to the Association and to judges. They were successful and I hope that we can sponsor them again. Bettina also advocated for the appointment of Hispanics in a majority of Governor-appointed judicial commissions in the state.

With this growth, the Association has benefited by renewed energy, ideas, and enthusiasm. One recent development has been an effort to partner with other minority bar associations across the state in various ways.

To that end, the MHBA has co-sponsored several legal networking events. By continuing to serve our membership with important networking opportunities, the MHBA stays relevant to its membership as the Hispanic legal population in Maryland grows. This historical retrospective speaks of just a few of the many projects that the MHBA has been involved in and implemented as a bar organization.

With the steadfast commitment and participation of its membership, The Maryland Hispanic Bar Association will continue to fulfill its mission and purpose — to remain ever vigilant regarding the legal rights of minorities, to advocate for the nomination of qualified Latino attorneys to the bench, and to advance the profession through service to the community.

Compiled by Sylvia Ontaneda-Bernales, Esq.

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  1. They were all marvelous and their contributions were of great benefit for the Hispanic and Korean communities. I was honored to chair this effort. A few answered to let her know whether or not they were of Hispanic descent and if they wanted to participate in forming a bar association, but the majority did not respond.

  2. This historical retrospective speaks of just a few of the many projects that the MHBA has been involved in and implemented as a bar organization. This Circuit Court House event with the Korean Bar was truly a success because we had the cooperation of individuals like Judges Weinstein, Harrington, and other judges who presided over the mock trials, and the Prosecutors who took part in the criminal and traffic mock trials.

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