Why does sex discrimination seem to persist on wall street. Working Mothers Gain Acceptance, But Perceptions of Sexism Persist, Poll Shows.



Why does sex discrimination seem to persist on wall street

Why does sex discrimination seem to persist on wall street

By Michael Hiltzik Oct 26, 5: More recently, the picture of a bro-dominated culture at Uber painted by former Uber engineer Susan J. Each of these events produced the impression that things finally would change, what with sunlight finally being shined on pervasive discrimination, harassment, and even assault in the workplace.

But those hopes largely have been unfulfilled, and that's a warning for anyone hoping that disclosures of sexual abuse by Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein and others in the entertainment industry will change its abusive culture. Disclosure and sunlight are a start, but real change takes much more.

Moving Harvey Weinstein out is necessary, but not sufficient. But how you take that and create lasting change is still not clear. My Fight for Inclusion and Lasting Change," was published last month. For many on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley, change is virtually invisible. In , nearly 15 years after that ostensibly landmark Smith Barney case, Goldman Sachs was hit with a lawsuit alleging that male bankers were rewarded with better pay and promotions than equally accomplished women, and that the atmosphere at the firm was sexually demeaning and even abusive.

Column By Michael Hiltzik Jun 14, 2: Better opportunities for males means more success, creating a positive feedback loop: Fowler witnessed this effect firsthand at Uber when she reported a manager who turned out to be a serial sexual harasser. Unless the general atmosphere in a company or industry is changed, then individual cases of abuse will continue to bubble up, and they'll always be the tip of the iceberg. That means creating a diverse management, with more women and people of color.

But that's difficult, since dominant cultures tend to be self-perpetuating. Male monocultures, like any others, tend to set their own insular standards of behavior — in the case of what she witnessed, "a culture of toxic masculinity.

Facebook's technology workforce is overwhelmingly male and white. Facebook "What you've seen," says Krawchek, who has founded Ellevest, an online platform for women investors, "is not a great deal of progress over the past decade. If there's a hopeful sign for women in the workplace in the surge of publicity about sexual harassment and assault in Hollywood, it's the erosion of the long-standing pressures for silence that have prevailed for decades.

On Wall Street and in Silicon Valley, where harassment typically plays out within the employer-employee relationship, silence has been enforced through mandatory arbitration of workplace complaints. Advertisement "Mandatory arbitration is at the core of so many of these problems," says Susan Antilla, the author of "Tales from the Boom-Boom Room," a book about the Smith Barney lawsuit and other Wall Street discrimination cases of that era.

Google says it's aiming for a more diverse workforce, but progress is slow, with only single-percentage-point improvements in the numbers of Latino and black employees, and in the numbers of women in tech and corporate leadership in a year.

Google But there also has been intense pressure on women not to speak out, whether to protect the careers of their abusers, protect their own prospects for advancement, or to avoid shame and stigma. The women who accuse Harvey Weinstein of harassment and assault often were actresses at the beginning of their careers, dealing with a man at the pinnacle of the entertainment industry with the power to make their future or consign them to oblivion.

As my colleague James Rufus Koren has reported , men in such powerful positions — Weinstein, former Fox News chief Roger Ailes and on-screen personality Bill O'Reilly — have been able to settle those allegations with payoffs conditioned on nondisclosure agreements, creating a "silencing culture" in Hollywood. Yet not only have individual women been victimized, but the industries themselves have been hobbled by the blinkered attitudes fostered by their lack of diversity.

Fans of the Amazon TV show "Good Girls Revolt," a potential breakout hit about workplace discrimination in the s, have observed that the Amazon Studios head who pulled the plug, Roy Price, resigned this month after being accused of sexual harassment by a female producer on a different Amazon show.

The breakdown of the culture of silence over gender abuse in the workplace, especially in Hollywood, has produced a remarkable surge of public awareness.

Follow hiltzikm on Twitter, see his Facebook page , or email michael.

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Wal-Mart sex discrimination case



Why does sex discrimination seem to persist on wall street

By Michael Hiltzik Oct 26, 5: More recently, the picture of a bro-dominated culture at Uber painted by former Uber engineer Susan J. Each of these events produced the impression that things finally would change, what with sunlight finally being shined on pervasive discrimination, harassment, and even assault in the workplace.

But those hopes largely have been unfulfilled, and that's a warning for anyone hoping that disclosures of sexual abuse by Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein and others in the entertainment industry will change its abusive culture. Disclosure and sunlight are a start, but real change takes much more. Moving Harvey Weinstein out is necessary, but not sufficient. But how you take that and create lasting change is still not clear. My Fight for Inclusion and Lasting Change," was published last month.

For many on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley, change is virtually invisible. In , nearly 15 years after that ostensibly landmark Smith Barney case, Goldman Sachs was hit with a lawsuit alleging that male bankers were rewarded with better pay and promotions than equally accomplished women, and that the atmosphere at the firm was sexually demeaning and even abusive.

Column By Michael Hiltzik Jun 14, 2: Better opportunities for males means more success, creating a positive feedback loop: Fowler witnessed this effect firsthand at Uber when she reported a manager who turned out to be a serial sexual harasser. Unless the general atmosphere in a company or industry is changed, then individual cases of abuse will continue to bubble up, and they'll always be the tip of the iceberg.

That means creating a diverse management, with more women and people of color. But that's difficult, since dominant cultures tend to be self-perpetuating. Male monocultures, like any others, tend to set their own insular standards of behavior — in the case of what she witnessed, "a culture of toxic masculinity. Facebook's technology workforce is overwhelmingly male and white. Facebook "What you've seen," says Krawchek, who has founded Ellevest, an online platform for women investors, "is not a great deal of progress over the past decade.

If there's a hopeful sign for women in the workplace in the surge of publicity about sexual harassment and assault in Hollywood, it's the erosion of the long-standing pressures for silence that have prevailed for decades.

On Wall Street and in Silicon Valley, where harassment typically plays out within the employer-employee relationship, silence has been enforced through mandatory arbitration of workplace complaints. Advertisement "Mandatory arbitration is at the core of so many of these problems," says Susan Antilla, the author of "Tales from the Boom-Boom Room," a book about the Smith Barney lawsuit and other Wall Street discrimination cases of that era.

Google says it's aiming for a more diverse workforce, but progress is slow, with only single-percentage-point improvements in the numbers of Latino and black employees, and in the numbers of women in tech and corporate leadership in a year. Google But there also has been intense pressure on women not to speak out, whether to protect the careers of their abusers, protect their own prospects for advancement, or to avoid shame and stigma.

The women who accuse Harvey Weinstein of harassment and assault often were actresses at the beginning of their careers, dealing with a man at the pinnacle of the entertainment industry with the power to make their future or consign them to oblivion.

As my colleague James Rufus Koren has reported , men in such powerful positions — Weinstein, former Fox News chief Roger Ailes and on-screen personality Bill O'Reilly — have been able to settle those allegations with payoffs conditioned on nondisclosure agreements, creating a "silencing culture" in Hollywood. Yet not only have individual women been victimized, but the industries themselves have been hobbled by the blinkered attitudes fostered by their lack of diversity. Fans of the Amazon TV show "Good Girls Revolt," a potential breakout hit about workplace discrimination in the s, have observed that the Amazon Studios head who pulled the plug, Roy Price, resigned this month after being accused of sexual harassment by a female producer on a different Amazon show.

The breakdown of the culture of silence over gender abuse in the workplace, especially in Hollywood, has produced a remarkable surge of public awareness. Follow hiltzikm on Twitter, see his Facebook page , or email michael.

Why does sex discrimination seem to persist on wall street

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3 Comments

  1. Facebook "What you've seen," says Krawchek, who has founded Ellevest, an online platform for women investors, "is not a great deal of progress over the past decade. But that's difficult, since dominant cultures tend to be self-perpetuating. But stalwart claimants who insisted on a hearing are finally getting one.

  2. Hearings just finished for two former Smith Barney women who now await decisions. Moving Harvey Weinstein out is necessary, but not sufficient.

  3. Advertisement "Mandatory arbitration is at the core of so many of these problems," says Susan Antilla, the author of "Tales from the Boom-Boom Room," a book about the Smith Barney lawsuit and other Wall Street discrimination cases of that era. By Michael Hiltzik Oct 26, 5:

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